I'm Obsessed with Mini Double Horn Necklaces So I Made My Own

Hello, trend.

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Have you noticed double horn necklaces popping up everywhere all the sudden? I am absolutely SMITTEN with this trend. I know I don't often jump on board with fashion trends, let alone jewelry (I'd rather have ten more liquid lipsticks) but this one I'm all about.

I will admit the first ones I saw, I thought they were crecent moons and I was digging the boho witchy vibes.  

But once I did literally an ounce of research into it, I learned that they are called double horn necklaces. Sometimes you can find them in gold, some designers actually make them from cow bone (which even I found a bit macabre) or in my case they're made of clay. I've been wearing my double horn necklace like basically every day and telling everyone I've ever seen that I made it myself so I had to write a little ditty on the thing. Here's all the details.

After I saw a DIY video on making clay double horn necklace charms I was all in. I made like thirty from half of one chunk of Sculpy. It was a good day, I tell ya'. I followed this video from The Sorry Girls pretty much to the T and made quite a few options in different sizes. I even went in and did the clay glaze. 

After making my own from Sculpy Polymer Clay and breaking a few baked pieces in the process, I learned that it's not necessarily the best choice of polymer clay for jewelry making. Not, at least, if you want them to stay semi-translucent and unbroken. 

I fell down the YouTube rabbit hole of polymer clay (who knew that was a niche?) and found out your best bet is probably Primo clay in Translucent. From the insights of the PolymerClayTutor, I kid you not, you should bake your clay for way, way longer than recommended on the package. Like, an hour, as opposed to ten minutes. This, she says, makes the clay flexible and if you use her recommendation of Primo clay it's basically unbreakable. Considering how many of these things I've broken I can tell you the extra baking and using the proper clay is well worth it.

Once your double horns are made and baked (on not a metal surface, learned that the hard way) you can glue on jump rings and slide it right onto your chain of choice. I highly suggest skipping the aforementioned clay glaze because in just a few weeks of wear it's already chipping off. Plus the matte effect of polymer clay makes for an even more bone-like effect.

Or if all of this is way too much effort (I get it!) you can always take a shop through the widget below.